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The RMA suite of hydrodynamic and water quality models form a sophisticated, robust, time series tool for the simulation of the prototype conditions and design impacts. They are very flexible models that may be used for coastal, estuarine and river simulation in steady state or dynamic mode. Assemblages of one/two/three dimensional elements may be used in the same network, thus leading to considerable computer time and cost saving in complex systems.

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Enhanced RMA

The RMA suite of hydrodynamic and water quality models form a sophisticated, robust, time series tool for the simulation of the prototype conditions and design impacts. They are very flexible models that may be used for coastal, estuarine and river simulation in steady state or dynamic mode. Assemblages of one/two/three dimensional elements may be used in the same network, thus leading to considerable computer time and cost saving in complex systems. The RMA finite element models were originally developed with the support of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Waterways Experiment Station (WES) for simulation of 1, 2, and 3-dimensional hydrodynamics, water quality and sediment transport in rivers, bays, and estuaries. These models form the basis of the Corps of Engineers TABS modeling system.

RMA2 Overview

RMA2 is a two dimensional depth averaged finite element hydrodynamic numerical model. It computes water surface elevations and horizontal velocity components for subcritical, free-surface flow in two-dimensional flow fields. RMA2 computes a finite element solution of the Reynolds form of the Navier-Stokes equations for turbulent flows. Friction is calculated with the Mannings or Chezy equation, and eddy viscosity coefficients are used to define turbulence characteristics. Both steady and unsteady state (dynamic) problems can be analyzed.

RMA10 Overview

RMA10 is a multi-dimensional (combining 1-D, 2-D either depth or laterally averaged, and 3-D elements) finite element numerical model written in FORTRAN-77. It is capable of steady or dynamic simulation of three-dimensional hydrodynamics, salinity, and sediment transport. It utilizes an unstructured grid and uses a Galerkin based finite element numerical scheme. The WES Coastal & Hydraulics Laboratory version is based upon the work of Dr. Ian King of Resource Management Associates.