MOUSE Features

MOUSE is the most advanced, powerful, and comprehensive surface runoff, open channel flow, pipe flow, water quality, and sediment transport modeling package available for analyzing urban drainage systems, stormwater sewers, and sanitary sewers. MOUSE is the only model that combines complex hydrology, hydraulics, water quality, and sediment transport in a completely graphical, easy-to-use interface.

Easy Model Development

MOUSE is easy to learn and use. MOUSE models can be quickly developed using a variety of different sources. For example, network components can be directly imported from an ArcView®, ArchInfo®, or MapInfo® GIS, or be interactively created using a mouse by simply pointing and clicking. Graphical symbols are used to represent network elements, such as manholes, pipes, pumps, weirs, ditches, channels, and detention ponds. MOUSE allows you, at any time, to interactively add, insert, delete, or move any network component, automatically updating the model. For example, selecting and moving a manhole automatically moves all connected pipes, ditches, channels, and pumps.

The graphical representation of the model can be output at any drawing scale. Pipes can be curvilinear and lengths automatically computed. Scanned TIFF or BMP aerial images or maps, or DXF maps of streets, parcels, and buildings can be displayed as a background image, allowing the user to quickly digitize a network model, confirm the network layout, or simply enhance the outputted modeling results. And, the Network Element Inspector allows the user to point and click on any network manhole, pipe, pump, weir, ditch, channel, or detention pond from the horizontal plan view to quickly determine the defined input data and output modeling results.

MOUSE models can be quickly developed using its easy–to–use graphical interface—or can be imported directly from ArcView GIS.


Developed by an Industry Leader

MOUSE is the product of Danish Hydraulic Institute (DHI), a world renowned international research and consulting organization that has provided engineering services in coastal, marine, and water resources for clients in over 120 countries. Established in 1964 and affiliated with the Danish Academy of Technical Sciences, DHI offers a broad spectrum of services, software tools, and model test facilities related to offshore, coastal, port, river, water resources, urban hydraulics, and environmental engineering. There are currently over 1,500 installations of MOUSE worldwide.

Unparalleled Modeling Capabilities

MOUSE is a link-node based model that performs hydrology, hydraulic, water quality, and sediment transport analysis of stormwater and wastewater drainage systems, including sewage treatment plants and water quality control devices. A link represents a hydraulic element—such as a pipe, channel, pump, stand pipe, culvert, or weir—that transports flow and constituents. There are numerous different link element types supported by MOUSE. A node can represent the junction of two or more links, the location of a flow or pollutant input into the system, or as storage element, such as a detention pond, stilling basin, or lake.

Typical applications of MOUSE include predicting combined sewer overflows (CSO), sanitary sewer overflows (SSO), interconnected pond analysis, open and closed conduit flow analysis, design of new site developments, NPDES permitting procedures, Best Management Practices, and analysis of existing stormwater and sanitary sewer systems. In applying MOUSE, it is possible answer questions, such as:

  • What are the return periods for overloading of various parts of the existing sewer system?
  • What are the main causes of that overloading—backwater or insufficient pipe capacity?
  • What are the implications of replacing critical sewers, installing new detention ponds, outfall structures, etc.?
  • How is the long-term environmental impact affected by changing the operational policy?
  • Where and why are sediments deposited in the sewer network?
  • What are the peak concentrations of pollutants at the overflow weir or treatment plant after a rainstorm?

MOUSE solves the complete St. Venant (dynamic flow) equations throughout the drainage network and includes modeling of backwater effects, flow reversal, surcharging, looped connections, pressure flow, tidal outfalls, and interconnected ponds. The program can be applied to any type of pipe network system with alternating free surface and pressurized flows. Flow can also be routed through a variety of different storage elements, such as detention ponds, settling ponds, and lakes. MOUSE can model any shape conduit pipe using the St. Venant flow equations. Both subcritical and supercritical flows, as well as backwater effects and surcharges, are precisely simulated.

The computational scheme uses an implicit, finite difference numerical solution of the St. Venant flow equations. The numerical algorithm uses a self-adapting time-step, which provides efficient and accurate solutions in multiple connected branched and looped pipe networks. This computational scheme is applicable to unsteady flow conditions that occur in pipes ranging from small-profile collectors for detailed urban drainage, to low-lying, often pressurized, sewer mains affected by varying outlet water levels. Both subcritical and supercritical flows are treated by means of the same computational scheme that adapts to the local flow conditions. In addition, flow phenomena, such as backwater effects and surcharges, are precisely simulated.

Continuous Simulation Module

The Continuous Simulation (NAM) Module provides detailed, continuous modeling of the complete land phase of the hydrologic cycle, providing support for urban, rural, and mixed catchments. Precipitation is routed through four different types of storage: snow, surface, root zone, and ground water, resulting in more accurate hydrographs. Instead of performing hydraulic and pollution load analysis of the sewer system only for short periods of high intensity rainstorms, a continuous, long-term analysis can be used to look at periods of both wet and dry weather, as well as inflows and infiltration to the sewer network. This provides a more realistic picture of actual wastewater loads on treatment plants and combined sewer overflows.

Real-Time Control Module

The Real-Time Control (RTC) Module allows real-time control devices to be included in defining the urban drainage sewer network model. A wide selection of controllable devices is provided, along with user-specified control rules. By using real-time controls in defining the network model, the model can be used for long-term simulations and planning. Impacts to the current system can be tested to see what effect the changes to control rules will have. This allows the user to develop the optimal control strategy for both NPDES permitting procedures and Best Management Practices. MOUSE supports real-time controls in defining the network model, allowing the model to be used for long-term simulations and planning.

Sediment Transport and Water Quality

MOUSE provides several modules for the simulation of sediment transport and water quality for both surface runoff and sewer systems. Since pollutants are carried by sediment, sediment transport and water quality in sewer systems are closely interconnected. This is important to understanding the first flush effect, which can only be simulated with a description of the temporal and spatial distribution of sediment deposits on the catchment surface and in the sewer system. MOUSE can model these complex mechanisms using its Surface Runoff Quality (SRQ), Pipe Sediment Transport (ST), Pipe Advection-Dispersion (AD), and Pipe Water Quality (WQ) Modules. Output from these modules, such as pollutant graphs from combined sewer overflows, can then be applied directly to MIKE 11. Using MIKE 11 in conjunction with MOUSE allows assessment of water quality for the water bodies receiving these sewer overflows, such as rivers, streams, and lakes. MOUSE can perform complex simulation of sediment transport and water quality for both surface runoff and sewer systems.

Surface Runoff Quality Module

The primary role of the Surface Runoff Quality (SRQ) Module is to provide a physically-based description of the relevant processes associated with sediments and pollutants due to surface runoff, and then provide surface runoff sediment and pollutant data for the other pipe sewer network sediment transport and water quality modules. The following processes can be accounted for:

  • Build-up and wash-off of sediment particles on the catchment.
  • Surface transport of pollutants attached to the sediment particles.
  • Build-up and wash-out of dissolved pollutants in potholes and stilling basins.

Pipe Sediment Transport Module

Sediment deposits can greatly reduce the hydraulic capacity of sewer pipes by restricting their flow area and increasing the bed friction resistance. The Pipe Sediment Transport (ST) Module can account for these problems, by simulating pipe sewer network sediment transport—including deposition and erosion from non-uniform (graded) sediments. Contributions from rainstorm wash-off and dry-weather wastewater flow can be included. The ST Module runs in conjunction with the dynamic flow routing, thereby simulating dynamic deposition of sediment and providing feedback due to the change in pipe area and resistance caused by sediment deposition. The following issues can be addressed:

  • Build-up and wash-off of sediment particles on the catchment.
  • Surface transport of pollutants attached to the sediment particles.
  • Build-up and wash-out of dissolved pollutants in potholes and stilling basins.
Mouse provides comprehensive runoff, open channel flow, water quality, and sediment transport modeling for analyzing urban drainage systems, stormwater sewers, and sanitary sewers


Pipe Advection-Dispersion Module

The Pipe Advection-Dispersion (AD) Module simulates the transport of dissolved substances and suspended fine sediments in pipe flow. Conservative materials as well as those that are subject to a linear decay can be simulated. The computed pipe flow discharges, water levels, and cross-sectional flow areas are used in the AD Module computation. The solution of the advection-dispersion equation is obtained using an implicit, finite-difference scheme which has negligible numerical dispersion. Concentration profiles with very steep fronts can be accurately modeled. The computed results can be displayed as longitudinal concentration profiles and pollutant graphs, which could be used at the inflow to a sewage treatment plant or an overflow structure. The AD Module can be linked to the Real-Time Control (RTC) Module to provide long-term simulations of pollutant transport.

Pipe Water Quality Module

The Pipe Water Quality (WQ) Module works in conjunction with the Advection-Dispersion Module, thereby providing many options for describing the reaction processes of multi-compound systems, including degradation of organic matter, bacterial fate, exchange of oxygen with the atmosphere, and oxygen demand from eroded sewer sediments. This allows realistic analysis of complex phenomena related to water quality in sewer systems. The WQ Module includes diurnal variation of foul flow discharges and user-specified concentrations of foul flow components. The sediment types included in the interaction with the WQ Module are foul flow organic sediments, and fine and course mineral in-pipe sediments originating from catchment runoff, potholes, and stilling basins. The WQ Module can account for:

  • Decay of BOD/COD in biofilm and water phase.
  • Hydrolysis of suspended matter.
  • Growth of suspended biomass.
  • Oxygen consumption from decay of BOD/COD, biofilm, and erosion of sediment.
  • Reaeration.
  • Bacterial fate.
  • Interaction with sediments for nutrients and metals.

Advanced Output

MOUSE graphical capabilities are unparalleled, providing horizontal plan plots, profile plots, and time series plots. All graphical plots can be printed at any user-defined scale. On the horizontal plan plot, MOUSE provides automatic color-coding of links and nodes based upon any input or output property—allowing the network to be color-coded based upon pipe sizes, flowrates, velocities, hydraulic grades, water quality concentrations, and any other attribute. Directional flow arrows can be plotted alongside the pipes to show the flow direction for any time step. Furthermore, pipes can be plotted with variable width and nodes with variable radius, allowing the user to quickly identify those areas of the network experiencing the most surcharge, flow, pollutant concentration, etc.

MOUSE will automatically generate graphical animations, including creation of Microsoft AVI files, for both horizontal plan plots and profile plots showing values that change with respect to time. Multiple animations can be performed simultaneously, allowing the user to plot several different profiles and watch all the results along that profile line, each in a separate window. Display of multiple animation views is automatically synchronized. In addition, profile plots can have two separate vertical axes to allow plotting of variables from two separate unit based upon pipe sizes, flowrates, velocities, hydraulic grades, water quality concentrations, and any other attribute. Directional flow arrows can be plotted alongside the pipes to show the flow direction for any time step. Furthermore, pipes can be plotted with variable width and nodes with variable radius, allowing the user to quickly identify those areas of the network experiencing the most surcharge, flow, pollutant concentration, etc.

Multiple time-series plots can be generated for various network elements, such as pipe flow, velocity, pollutant concentration, and loading. In addition, MOUSE allows the user to display and compare multiple result files simultaneously, as either horizontal plan plots, profile plots, or time-series plots—allowing direct comparison between different simulation models. MOUSE can display its graphical output on horizontal plan plots, profile plots, and time series plots.

Complete ArcView GIS Integration

Also available is MOUSE GIS™, an ArcView-based application for both MOUSE and MIKE SWMM™ users. This ArcView application provides a direct link to ArcView GIS, providing both a spatial data and visual representation of the stormwater sewer network. MOUSE GIS saves a great deal of time, greatly reducing the work required in setting-up and developing a GIS-based MOUSE model. For example, MOUSE GIS can easily integrate with existing GIS and asset management databases, allowing the user to quickly extract data when developing a MOUSE model. In addition, MOUSE simulation results can be directly displayed by MOUSE GIS. For example, locations of CSO and SSO points, manhole overflows, pipe surcharging, and floodplain flooding can be quickly identified. MOUSE GIS provides a direct link to ArcView GIS, providing both a spatial data and visual representation of the stormwater sewer network.

Sophisticated Data Management

MOUSE uses a Microsoft compliant ODBC database for storing and manipulating network data. This provides unlimited flexibility for defining and modifying the sewer model data. For example, you can perform QBE (query by example) to select those pipes having a specific diameter, shape, roughness, etc. and then make global changes to this selected data. Database query results can be displayed graphically (by highlighting the selected elements in the horizontal plan view), in tabular format, printed, or copied to other Windows applications using the Windows clipboard.

Built-in Model Checker

Included with MOUSE is a built-in Model Checker. The Model Checker will review the input data specified for the selected analysis model. If it encounters an error with the input data, it will explain what is wrong and how you can correct it. The Model Checker can be thought of as an expert modeler, pointing out any errors contained within the model.